1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+

1652_USA_Massachusetts_Bay_Colony_Rare_Silver_3_Pence_Oak_Tree_Coin_NGC_F_01_ylgj
1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+
1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+
1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+
1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+

1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+
1652 USA , Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence “Oak Tree” Coin. Mint Year: 1652 Denomination: 3 Pence Reference: NOE 23, KM-8. Certified and graded by NGC as Fine Details: Holed & Bent! Obverse: Oak-tree within inner circle. Reverse: Date (1652) above value (III) within inner circle. The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. The state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U. Coins were issued in denominations of 3 and 6 pence and 1 shilling. The first pieces bore the letters “NE” and the denomination “III”, “VI” or “XII”. The coins were smaller than the equivalent sterling coins by 22.5%. Later pieces, struck between 1652 and 1660 or 1662, bore the image of a willow tree, with an oak tree appearing on coins produced between 1660 or 1662 and ca. However, the most famous design was the final one to be issued, the pine tree type, struck between ca. The coins circulated widely in North America and the Caribbean. The coins nearly all bore the date “1652”. This was the date of the local legislation sanctioning the production of coins. The date was maintained by the Massachusetts moneyers in order to appear to be complying with English law that reserved the right of produce coins to the crown, since, in 1652, England was a Commonwealth (King Charles I having been beheaded three years previously). The coins were struck by John Hull and Robert Sanderson, two Massachusetts settlers. The image of the pine tree on the later coins may symbolize an important export for Massachusetts – pine trees for ships’ masts. The mint was closed by the government in 1682. The Massachusetts Bay Colony (more formally The Colony of Massachusetts Bay , 16281691) was an English settlement on the east coast of America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the. Province of Massachusetts Bay. The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land about 15.4 miles (24.8 km) apartthe areas around Salem and Boston. The territory nominally administered by the colony covered much of central New England, including portions of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as the Pacific Ocean. The Dutch colony of New Netherland disputed many of these claims, arguing that they held rights to land beyond Rhode Island up to the western side of Cape Cod, under the jurisdiction of Plymouth Colony at the time. The Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded by the owners of the Massachusetts Bay Company, which included investors in the failed Dorchester Company which had established a short-lived settlement on Cape Ann in 1623. The colony began in 1628 and was the company’s second attempt at colonization. It was successful, with about 20,000 people migrating to New England in the 1630s. The population was strongly Puritan, and its governance was dominated by a small group of leaders who were strongly influenced by Puritan teachings. Its governors were elected, and the electorate were limited to freemen who had been examined for their religious views and formally admitted to the local church. As a consequence, the colonial leadership exhibited intolerance to other religious views, including Anglican, Quaker, and Baptist theologies. The colonists initially had good relationships with the local Indian populations, but frictions developed which ultimately led to the Pequot War (163638) and then to King Philip’s War (167578), after which most of the Indians in southern New England made peace treaties with the colonists (apart from the Pequot tribe, whose survivors were largely absorbed into the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes following the Pequot War). The colony was economically successful, engaging in trade with England and the West Indies. A shortage of hard currency prompted it to establish a mint in 1652. Political differences with England after the English Restoration led to the revocation of the colonial charter in 1684. King James II established the Dominion of New England in 1686 to bring all of the New England colonies under firmer crown control. The dominion collapsed after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 deposed James, and the Massachusetts Bay Colony reverted to rule under the revoked charter until 1691, when a new charter was issued for the Province of Massachusetts Bay. This province combined the Massachusetts Bay territories with those of the Plymouth Colony and proprietary holdings on Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. Sir William Phips arrived in 1692 bearing the charter and formally took charge of the new province. The item “1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+” is in sale since Tuesday, April 21, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Colonial”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Wien. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC
  • Year: 1652
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Circulated
  • Composition: Silver

1652 USA, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Rare Silver 3 Pence Oak Tree Coin. NGC F+